Dedicated to making maths elementary

Past Results


GCSE Maths August 2018 Results 


5 passes from 5 including 1 C, 2 B's, 1 A* and 1 A**. 

The actual numbered grades achieved under the new grading system were as follows: one 4, two 6's, one 8 and one 9.

Maths Made Elementary 'A* - C' Pass Rate for 2018: 100%
National 'A* - C' Pass Rate for 2018: 59.8%



GCSE Maths August 2017 Results
 


7 passes from 7
 including 6 C's and 1 A. 

The actual numbered grades achieved under the new grading system were as follows: three 4's, three 5's and one 7.

Maths Made Elementary 'A* - C' Pass Rate for 2017: 100%
National 'A* - C' Pass Rate for 2017: 68.9%


GCSE Maths August 2016 Results 


7 passes from 8
 including 1 A, 3 B's and 3 C's


Maths Made Elementary 'A* - C' Pass Rate for 2016: 
87.5%
National 'A* - C' Pass Rate for 2016: 61%


GCSE Maths August 2015 Results

12 passes from 14 including 1 A*, 2 A's, 6 B's and 3 C's


Maths Made Elementary 'A* - C' Pass Rate for 2015: 85.7%
National 'A* - C' Pass Rate for 2015: 63.3%


GCSE Maths August 2014 Results


11 passes from 14


Maths Made Elementary 'A* - C' Pass Rate for 2014: 78.6%
National 'A* - C' Pass Rate for 2014: 62.4%

Well  done!

Well done to all students for the levels of improvement achieved. Rest assured, I am far less interested in final grades than I am in rates of progress. If students simply concentrate on accelerating their rates of progress, the results will no doubt take care of themselves in the end.

A warning about GCSE grade boundaries:


With the latest GCSE grade boundaries now set higher than ever, you will have to be one hundred percent on your game to even be sure of a pass. Many students who would only just have obtained their desired grade under the old pre-2013 regime would fall short given the grade boundaries as they are currently set. My advice to students preparing to sit GCSE Maths exams is to work harder than ever to make sure you don't become a victim to this recent repositioning of the goal posts.

The 2012-2013 shift in grade boundaries means that many students improving their results by a percentage normally awarded a two-grade improvement will only be showing an improvement of one grade. And those showing an improvement normally awarded a one-grade increase may end up not showing any apparent improvement in grade score at all! This means that literally thousands are falling short who would, in countless years gone by, have achieved a passing grade fairly comfortably. These grade boundary increases appear even more ruthless for those students who already had a mountain to climb in trying to improve on a grade E. In years past, an improvement of two grades from E in a mock exam to a C in the actual exam would have been attainable given enough time and hard work on the part of the student. The 2012-2013 increase in grade boundaries is effectively telling many of these students that a percentage increase normally commensurate with a two-grade improvement may still not be enough. In other words, they're being told they better target a percentage increase more in accord with a three-grade increase to compensate for the one grade they're going to be docked as the bar gets raised.

To those of you finding yourself in this unenviable position, I am as displeased about it as you no doubt are. It would seem you're being punished for choosing to be born in the wrong year. If a two-grade improvement is difficult, then three is almost inconceivable. But it's not impossible. So try and rise to the challenge.

It's important to remember there will always be volatility and uncertainty with boundaries from one year to the next, so the best thing you can do is to target a percentage score which is, at the very minimum, ten percent above the grade boundary set from the previous year. 

To all those students who missed out on their desired grades due to these latest harsh boundary increases, you have my deepest sympathies. However, do not allow your disappointments to become anything more than short-lived. Grow defiant and come back even stronger next time! And check out an essay I have written for this website in which I try to make the case for an all-important new perspective on failure.

Finally, for top tips on how you can maximise your own rates of progress to guarantee success in exams, please check out my blogged article entitled Important advice for tutees of Maths Made Elementary. In this article, I warn students about the perils of becoming complacent when receiving additional one-to-one support. If your goal is to maximise your own rates of progress so as to get the most from your lessons, then this article is a 'must-read'!

To give you some idea of what you can expect under the latest 2013 grade boundaries compared with those of 2012, I have outlined the differences for the Maths, Linear format, Edexcel exams below:

Change in Grade Boundaries from 2012 - 2013:

June 2012 Grade
Boundaries for Linear
Maths(1MAO)

A*

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

U

Foundation Tier
Papers 1F and 2F
(% mark required)

N/A

N/A

N/A

65%

53%

41%

29.5%

18%

0%

Higher Tier
Papers 1H and 2H
(% mark required)

82%

64%

45%

26%

13%

6.5%

N/A

N/A

0%



March 2013 Grade Boundaries for
Linear Maths (1MAO)

A*

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

U

Foundation Tier
Papers 1F and 2F
(% mark required)

N/A

N/A

N/A

73.5%

61.5%

49.5%

37.5%

25.5%

0%

Higher Tier
Papers 1H and 2H
(% mark required)

84%

68%

49.5%

31.5%

15.5%

7.5%

N/A

N/A

0%